Posts in Speaker
Dan Fenyvesi M.S. R.D.

My first job after graduate school and getting my RD was with a public health clinic in Oakland. I found that after that job it wasn’t too hard to get employment, and jobs with other clinics, retreat centers, and colleges followed. In 2014 I received the Fulbright Scholar Grant to work in Nicaragua, that was also a big milestone for me and has allowed me to work on branching out to more international work.

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Becky Kerkenbush, MS, RD-AP, CSG, CD

My first job lead me to a skilled nursing facility, which was part of a small community hospital. I not only worked in long-term care there, but also in the outpatient setting. This offered me a diverse work experience and a valuable foundation for nutrition knowledge and skills. After this, I wanted to work in clinical nutrition and I’ve been there ever since. Clinical nutrition allows me to continue my work with the geriatric population, as well as practice in the areas of nutrition support, acute illness and chronic disease.

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Tony Stephan, RD, ACE-CPT

Right out of college I worked for a big box gym as an RD. I was promoted to club manager, and then regional manager for the nutrition program within 1.5 years. Then I left and formed my own company and have been doing this ever since!

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Cristel Moubarak, RD

I loved the multi-faceted aspects of the profession in which it is evidence-based, involves closely working with people, and offers a flexible career-path to participate in a variety of dimensions of its growing field. I wanted to help people discover a healthier version of themselves and live better. My desire to become a dietitian stemmed not only from wanting to consult with and advise a diverse clientele, but also to inspire a difference in my community.

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Libby Rothschild, MS, RD, CLC, CPT

I don’t worry about what people think. I focus on making an impact. If I were to feel concerned about what people think about my profession, then my mindset wouldn’t stay positive and focused. Instead of caring how people perceive my chosen title, I am busy creating content and solving the problems of my target audience. Once a dietitian confidently defines his or her business, at that point I ask you: Does it matter what other people think you do for a living? What matters is your end goal and I recommend to start by defining that. As Colon Powel said in his Ted Talk, “Have a vision and be demanding.” He didn’t say, “Have a vision and question what other people think about you while you’re on your journey.”

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